banner
bar
change in weather June 10 Chronological Bible Study

Timeline. Map. Go to today’s Bible reading: Ecclesiastes 11, 12; Psalm 73; Psalm 88; 1Kings 11:41-43; 2Chronicles 9:29-31

Weathering Life

Can we ever predict weather with certainty? Admittedly, forecasters are getting better at predicting it, but still the weather can catch them and us by surprise. In our future planning we do not know if the weather will be fair or if disaster lurks on the horizon. What is true with physical weather is also true in business. Farmers and other businessmen know that they should make some alternative plans and not put all their hopes in one investment of time or opportunity. Farmers may plant or harvest, and the weather may be good, fair, poor, or even severe. Stock prices go up and down. Opportunities are gained and lost. So, should we just all stay in our homes, watch TV and do nothing? No, we leave the physical weather or the weather of opportunities to our Sovereign God and do our best to work with them, in them, or around them. Many times we get more accomplished if we will just try. This is the message of Ecclesiastes 11:1-6.

King Solomon had a good beginning; he feared the LORD and walked in the ways of his father David. Solomon asked the LORD for wisdom to lead the nation of Israel. God was pleased with his request and gave him more wisdom than any other person of his day. People came from far distant lands to hear his wisdom and behold his greatness. In addition, God gave him wealth and honor. Unfortunately, after receiving all these things, Solomon got sloppy in his life. He started accumulating large amounts of wealth and married many foreign women who took his heart away from God. God told him that because he did this, his son would have the kingdom torn away from him with only one tribe to rule. Just because he was king and was favored by God, this did not make him exempt from judgment. Solomon wrote his book, Ecclesiastes, in his depression. He experienced the life of pleasure and wealth and found it all to be unfulfilling and worthless. He found that death was certain but life was as unpredictable as the weather. What should we do about it?

Our lives are unpredictable. Ecclesiastes 10:14b Solomon says, “No one knows what is coming-- who can tell him what will happen after him?” (NIV) Will we still have the same opportunities for doing good tomorrow as we have today? Will we still have our jobs? Will we still enjoy the same relationships or will they change? Will we have good health or poor health? Will we live or die? No man (or woman) knows the future, so how will he/she live now? Ecclesiastes 11 and 12 give us sage advice from King Solomon regarding the unpredictability of life.

First, Solomon says to young people (although addressed to young men, it could equally be addressed to young women),

Be happy, young man, while you are young, and let your heart give you joy in the days of your youth. Follow the ways of your heart and whatever your eyes see, but know that for all these things God will bring you to judgment, (Ecclesiastes 11:9, NIV).

Is Solomon being cynical? Not necessarily; he is telling the young to enjoy life but temper their ambitions with self control so they will not suffer from poor choices.

Second, for those who are not so young, Solomon exhorts, “banish anxiety from your heart and cast off the troubles of your body, for youth and vigor are meaningless,” (Ecclesiastes 11:10, NIV). Those who are middle aged often go through much anxiety, otherwise known as “the mid-life crisis.” They wish they were younger and they discourage themselves with thoughts of “I am not as young as I used to be” or “I am over the hill.” Solomon says to pursue youth and vigor is meaningless, or an empty and unfulfilling pursuit. Solomon says to banish or get rid of these anxieties. We need to have a higher, more worthy pursuit.

Third, to all people of all ages, he exhorts them to “Remember your Creator in the days of your youth, before the days of trouble come and the years approach when you will say, ‘I find no pleasure in them,’” (Ecclesiastes 12:1, NIV). Then, in poetical symbolism, Ecclesiastes 12:2-7 delineates the problems of old age: decreasing strength, fewer teeth, failing eyesight, sleeplessness, impaired hearing, fear of heights and venturing outside, white hair, stooped and slow walking, fading sexual desire, and possible stroke or heart attack before death. Such things come to us all; therefore, we should serve him in our youth and live to please him before our bodies wear out and die and our spirits go to our eternal home. God is sovereign, but it is our personal responsibility to make the most of our opportunities to serve him while we can.

Last, for all his readers, Solomon admonishes us with these words:

Now all has been heard; here is the conclusion of the matter: Fear God and keep his commandments, for this is the whole duty of man. For God will bring every deed into judgment, including every hidden thing, whether it is good or evil (Ecclesiastes 12:13-14, NIV).

Live your lives in reverence for God. All our deeds will be brought into judgment whether good or bad. When Jesus comes back to take us home to heaven, we want to be happy to see him, don't we?

Lessons to live by:

  • Weather is unpredictable. We must leave the physical weather or the weather of opportunities to our Sovereign God and do our best to work with them, in them, or around them. Many times we get more accomplished if we will just try.
  • The young should enjoy life but temper their ambitions with self control, so they will not suffer from poor choices.
  • To the middle-aged, Solomon says to pursue youth and vigor is meaningless, or an empty and unfulfilling pursuit. Solomon says to banish or get rid of these anxieties. We need to have a higher, more worthy pursuit.
  • We should serve God in our youth and live to please him before our bodies wear out and die, and our spirits go to our eternal home. God is sovereign, but it is our personal responsibility to make the most of our opportunities to serve him while we can.
  • Live your lives in reverence for God. All our deeds will be brought into judgment whether good or bad. Do you know him personally? (more...)

Today’s Bible memory verses:

Ecclesiastes 12:13-14

Now all has been heard; here is the conclusion of the matter: Fear God and keep his commandments, for this is the whole duty of man. For God will bring every deed into judgment, including every hidden thing, whether it is good or evil (NIV).

praying girl Write a private prayer response to today’s Bible study:

Please send your comments to mtbiblestudies@gmail.com

Previous Lesson  |  Next Lesson

Back to top of page
Return to Chronological Bible Studies main page
Go to Scriptures main page
Go to Topics main page
Go to Home page

Scripture
Contact Us
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

COPYRIGHT @ 2016, MASTER'S TOUCH BIBLE STUDIES